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Regular Exams and Cleanings

Regular exams are an important part of maintaining your oral health. During your regular exam, we will:

• Check for any problems you may not see or feel
• Look for cavities or other signs of tooth decay
• Inspect your teeth and gums for gingivitis and signs of periodontal disease
• Perform a thorough teeth cleaning

Your regular exam will take about 45 minutes. Each regular exam includes a detailed teeth cleaning, during which we will clean, polish, and rinse your teeth to remove any tartar and plaque that have built up on the tooth’s surface.

Crowns & Bridges

Crowns are a restorative procedure used to improve your tooth’s shape or to strengthen a tooth.

A crown is a “cap” cemented onto an existing tooth that usually covers the portion of your tooth above the gum line. In effect, the crown becomes your tooth’s new outer surface.

Crowns are most often used for teeth that are broken, worn, or have portions destroyed by tooth decay. Crowns can be made of porcelain, metal, or zirconia. Porcelain crowns are most often preferred because they mimic the translucency of natural teeth and are very strong.

Crowns are needed when there is insufficient tooth strength to hold a filling.

A Bridge replaces missing teeth with artificial teeth, looks great, and literally bridges the gap where one or more teeth may have been missing.

Dentures

Dentures are natural-looking replacement teeth that are removable. There are two types of dentures: full and partial.

Just like natural teeth, dentures need to be properly cared for. Use a gentle cleanser to brush your dentures, always keep them moist when they’re not in use, and be sure to keep your tongue and gums clean as well.

Extractions

A tooth may have so much decay that it puts the surrounding teeth at risk, so your doctor may recommend removal and replacement with a bridge or implant. Infection, orthodontic correction, or problems with a wisdom tooth can also require removal of a tooth.

When it is determined that a tooth needs to be removed, your dentist may extract it during a regular checkup or request another visit for this procedure.
Once a tooth has been removed, neighboring teeth may shift, causing problems with chewing or your jaw joint function. To avoid these complications, your dentist may recommend that you replace the extracted tooth.

Composite Fillings

Traditional dental restoratives, or fillings, may include gold, porcelain, or composite. Newer dental fillings include ceramic and plastic compounds that mimic the appearance of natural teeth. These compounds, often called composite resins, are typically used on the front teeth where a natural appearance is important.

There are two different kinds of fillings: direct and indirect. Direct fillings are placed into a prepared cavity during a single visit. Indirect fillings generally require two or more visits. These fillings include inlays, and veneers fabricated with ceramics or composites.

Mouthguards

Whether you wear braces or not, protecting your smile while playing sports is essential. Mouthguards help protect your teeth and gums from injury. If you participate in any kind of full-contact sport, the American Dental Association recommends you wear a mouthguard.

Nightguards

If you often wake up with jaw pain, earaches, or headaches, or find yourself clenching or grinding your teeth, you may have a common condition called “bruxism.” Many people do not even know they grind their teeth, because it often occurs during sleep. If not corrected, bruxism can lead to broken teeth, cracked teeth, or even tooth loss.

Nightguards are an easy way to prevent the wear and damage that teeth-grinding cause over time.